Pain Conditions we treat here at CSPP include:

Herpes zoster (shingles) is viral infection that causes a painful skin rash. Although shingles can occur anywhere on your body, it most often appears as a single stripe of blisters that wraps around either the left or the right side of your torso.

Cancer typically causes pain by growing into or destroying tissue near the cancer. Cancer pain can originate from the area where the cancer started, or from other areas in the body where the cancer has spread (metastases). As a tumor grows, it can cause pain by putting pressure on nerves, bones or organs.

Facet arthritis is a syndrome of the small zygapophysial joints or synovial joints from the cervical (neck), lumbar (lower back), and thoracic (upper/middle back) regions and is one of the root causes of localized or axial back or neck pain. The facet joints are well lubricated and allow for nearly 20% rotation in the lumbar, cervical and thoracic regions. They are also well innervated by small medial branch nerves that carry pain signals, often manifesting in back pain or spasm.

Facet arthritis is a syndrome of the small zygapophysial joints or synovial joints from the cervical (neck), lumbar (lower back), and thoracic (upper/middle back) regions and is one of the root causes of localized or axial back or neck pain. The facet joints are well lubricated and allow for nearly 20% rotation in the lumbar, cervical and thoracic regions. They are also well innervated by small medial branch nerves that carry pain signals, often manifesting in back pain or spasm.

Cervical radiculopathy, also known as a “pinched nerve” occurs when a nerve in the neck is compressed or irritated at the point where it branches away from the spinal cord. As a result, pain may radiate into the shoulder, in addition to muscle weakness and numbness that travels down the arm and into the hand.

Spinal stenosis occurs as a result of congenital or acquired narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal canal that may occur in any of the regions of the spine, including the lower back (lumbar stenosis), neck (cervical spinal stenosis) and upper/middle back (thoracic spinal stenosis). This narrowing causes a restriction to the spinal canal, resulting in a neurological deficit.

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, CRPS, formerly known as RSD Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, is a progressive disease of the Autonomic Nervous System, and more specifically, the Sympathetic Nervous System. The pain is characterized as constant, extremely intense, and out of proportion to the original injury. The pain is typically accompanied by swelling, skin changes, extreme sensitivity, and can often be debilitating. It usually affects one or more of the four limbs but can occur in any part of the body and in over 70% of the victims it spreads to additional areas.

Degenerative disc disease describes the symptoms of back or neck pain caused by wear-and-tear on a spinal disc. It can also possibly cause radiating weakness, numbness or hot, shooting pains in the arms or legs (radicular pain). Degenerative disc disease typically consists of a low-level chronic pain with intermittent episodes of more severe pain. Degenerative disc disease is one of the most common causes of low back pain and neck pain, and also one of the most misunderstood.

Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that is a common complication if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet.

Entrapment neuropathy, also known as nerve compression syndrome or compression neuropathy, is a medical condition caused by direct pressure on a nerve. It is commonly known as a trapped nerve, though this may also refer to nerve root compression (by a herniated disc, for example).

Facet arthritis is a syndrome of the small zygapophysial joints or synovial joints from the cervical (neck), lumbar (lower back), and thoracic (upper/middle back) regions and is one of the root causes of localized or axial back or neck pain. The facet joints are well lubricated and allow for nearly 20% rotation in the lumbar, cervical and thoracic regions. They are also well innervated by small medial branch nerves that carry pain signals, often manifesting in back pain or spasm.

Causes:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Trauma
  • Bone Spurs or Reactive Bone Formation

Failed back surgery syndrome (also known as FBSS, or failed back syndrome) is actually not a syndrome at all. It is a broad term that is often used to describe the condition of patients who have had an unsuccessful result with back surgery or spine surgery, and have experienced continued pain after surgery.

Failed Neck Surgery Syndrome or Failed Back Surgery Syndrome are the terms used to describe pain that starts or persists after a back or neck procedure. Although neither of these terms refer to actual syndromes, the word syndrome is commonly used to refer to the condition of new or persistent pain after undergoing neck or back surgery.

Groin pain is defined as pain in the area where the inner, upper thigh and lower abdomen meet.

The primary headache syndromes include migraine, tension-type, and cluster headaches. Migraine and cluster headaches are episodic and recurring conditions. Tension-type headaches are usually episodic but like migraine, it can become chronic, occurring daily or almost daily for more than 15 days a month.

Joints form the connections between bones. They provide support and help you move. Any damage to the joints from disease or injury can interfere with your movement and cause a lot of pain.

Many different conditions can lead to painful joints, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, bursitis, gout, strains, sprains, and other injuries. Joint pain is extremely common. In one national survey, about one-third of adults reported having joint pain within the past 30 days. Knee pain was the most common complaint, followed by shoulder and hip pain, but joint pain can affect any part of your body, from your ankles and feet to your shoulders and hands. As you get older, painful joints become increasingly more common.

Facet arthritis is a syndrome of the small zygapophysial joints or synovial joints from the cervical (neck), lumbar (lower back), and thoracic (upper/middle back) regions and is one of the root causes of localized or axial back or neck pain. The facet joints are well lubricated and allow for nearly 20% rotation in the lumbar, cervical and thoracic regions. They are also well innervated by small medial branch nerves that carry pain signals, often manifesting in back pain or spasm.

Facet arthritis is a syndrome of the small zygapophysial joints or synovial joints from the cervical (neck), lumbar (lower back), and thoracic (upper/middle back) regions and is one of the root causes of localized or axial back or neck pain. The facet joints are well lubricated and allow for nearly 20% rotation in the lumbar, cervical and thoracic regions. They are also well innervated by small medial branch nerves that carry pain signals, often manifesting in back pain or spasm.

Radiculopathy is a condition due to a compressed nerve in the spine that can cause pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness along the course of the nerve. Radiculopathy is most common in the lower back (lumbar radiculopathy) and in the neck (cervical radiculopathy), but can occur in any part of the spine.

Spinal stenosis occurs as a result of congenital or acquired narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal canal that may occur in any of the regions of the spine, including the lower back (lumbar stenosis), neck (cervical spinal stenosis) and upper/middle back (thoracic spinal stenosis). This narrowing causes a restriction to the spinal canal, resulting in a neurological deficit.

The word “myofascial” means muscle tissue (“myo”) and the connective tissue in and around it (“fascia”). Myofascial pain is often caused by muscle injury or repetitive strain. When stressed or injured, muscles often form trigger points, such as contracted knots, that cause pain and tightness.

Occipital neuralgia is a condition in which the nerves that run from the top of the spinal cord up through the scalp, known as the occipital nerves, are inflamed or injured. Common symptoms include pain in the back of your head or the base of your skull.

Osteoarthritis (OA) also referred to as degenerative joint disease (DJD) is a group of joint abnormalities involving degradation of joints, including articular cartilage and subchondral bone. It is not an inflammatory disease. Symptoms may include joint pain, tenderness, stiffness, locking, clicking, and sometimes an effusion. There are a variety of causes including hereditary, developmental, metabolic, and mechanical deficits. When bone surfaces become less well protected by cartilage, bone may be exposed and damaged. As a result of decreased movement secondary to pain, regional muscles may atrophy, and ligaments may become more lax.

A neuroma is a painful condition, and is also commonly referred to as a “pinched nerve” or a nerve tumor. It is a benign growth of nerve tissue frequently found between the third and fourth toes. A neuroma typically causes pain, a burning sensation, tingling, or numbness between the toes and in the ball of the foot.

Back pain is commonly seen as an inevitable part of getting older, but it can be a symptom of a more serious condition. If you are nearing age 60, it may be a sign that you have tiny cracks in your vertebrae, the bones that form your spine. When these small hairline fractures increase in number, they can eventually cause a vertebra to collapse, which is called spinal compression fracture.

Your peripheral nervous system sends information from your brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to the rest of your body. Peripheral neuropathy occurs due to damage to your peripheral nerves. It often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. It can also affect other areas of your body.

Piriformis Syndrome is a condition in which the piriformis muscle, a small muscle located deep in the buttock (behind the gluteus maximus), irritates the sciatic nerve. It is a common disorder, particularly among people who are over 40 years old, with over 200,000 cases per year in the United States.

Postherpetic neuralgia (also referred to as PHN) is a condition of recurring or persistent pain in an area of the body that has undergone an outbreak of of shingles, which is caused by the chickenpox (herpes zoster) virus. It usually begins after shingles lesions (blisters) begin to crust over and heal but may occur in some patients who do not produce lesions. Some investigators suggest the pain has to be present for three months to be termed PHN. Postherpetic neuralgia affects nerve fibers and skin, causing burning pain that lasts long after the rash and blisters of shingles disappear.

Postsurgical pain is defined as pain lasting more than 3 to 6 months after surgery, and the pain differs in quality and location from pain experienced prior to surgery. A primary goal of pain management after major surgery is for you to awaken relatively comfortable and to experience an uninterrupted transition to pain control, but some discomfort is common and should be anticipated after surgery.

A thoracotomy is a type of surgery that is carried out on a person’s chest, and is often used during the treatment of lung cancer. Thoracotomy is considered the most painful of surgical procedures; pain after the procedure is very severe, and can affect more than 50% of patients. Post-thoracotomy pain syndrome (or PTPS) is defined as pain that recurs or persists along a thoracotomy incision at least two months following the surgical procedure. In general, it is burning and stabbing pain with dysesthesia and thus shares many features of neuropathic pain.

Pudendal neuralgia is a little known type of chronic pelvic pain that originates from damage or irritation of the pudendal nerve. The pudendal nerve is one of the main nerves in the pelvis, supplying areas such as the:

  • Lower buttocks
  • Area between the buttocks and genitals (perineum)
  • Area around the back passage (rectum)
  • Vulva, labia, and clitoris in women
  • Scrotum and penis in men

Your ribs protect soft, fragile organs like your heart and lungs. A broken rib causes rib fracture pain, which is a common injury that occurs when one of the bones in your rib cage breaks or cracks. Many broken ribs are merely cracked. While still painful, cracked ribs aren’t as potentially dangerous as ribs that have been broken into separate pieces. A jagged edge of broken bone can damage major blood vessels or internal organs, such as the lung.

Sacroiliac joint dysfunction, also called sacroiliac joint disorder, sacroiliac joint disease, sacroiliac joint syndrome or sacroiliac syndrome, generally refers to pain in the sacroiliac joint region that is caused by abnormal motion in the sacroiliac joint, either too much motion or too little motion. It typically results in inflammation of the sacroiliac joint, and can be debilitating.

Sciatica or lumbar radiculopathy is a set of symptoms including pain caused by general compression or irritation of one (or more) of lumbar or sacral spinal nerve roots. Sciatica is a set of symptoms rather than a diagnosis for what is irritating the root of the nerve to cause the pain. Symptoms include lower back pain, buttock pain, and numbness, pain or weakness in various parts of the leg and foot. Other symptoms include a “pins and needles sensation, or tingling and difficulty moving or controlling the leg.

The thoracic outlet is the narrow space between your collarbone and first rib.. Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to a group of disorders that occur when there is compression, injury, or irritation of the nerves and/or blood vessels (arteries and veins) in the lower neck and upper chest area. The increased pressure on the blood vessels and nerves may cause pain in your shoulders, neck, and arms. It can also cause numbness or tingling in your hands.

Spinal stenosis occurs as a result of congenital or acquired narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal canal that may occur in any of the regions of the spine, including the lower back (lumbar stenosis), neck (cervical spinal stenosis) and upper/middle back (thoracic spinal stenosis). This narrowing causes a restriction to the spinal canal, resulting in a neurological deficit.

Trigeminal neuralgia, also known as “tic douloureux”, is an ongoing pain condition that affects certain nerves in your face.

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a chronic pain condition that affects the trigeminal nerve, which carries sensation from your face to your brain. You might also hear it called “tic douloureux.” There are about 12 cases per 100,000 people in the United States each year. If you have trigeminal neuralgia, even mild stimulation of your face – such as from brushing your teeth or putting on makeup — may trigger a jolt of excruciating pain.